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Evernote + Scrivener to write a book?

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Posted by Vincek
Oct 15, 2011 at 05:31 PM

 

Franz, Thanks for feedback that importing 10 files does not cause problems.  I can experiment with larger numbers.

Hugh,  Thanks for pointing me to the tutorial.  I tried it and found it needs cleaning up, so I will wait until Scrivener for Windows v 1.0 is realsed on Oct 31 to do major dive.

Yes, I am planning a non-fiction book.  Thanks for outlining suggestion. Scrivener seems ideally suited to an iterative writing process. The manual even has a reference to GROWING a book, rather than simply writing a book.  I will also watch for file size bloat that slows down the program.

Dr. Andus, thanks for your suggestion of an intermediate SW program.  I will keep in mind and hope I can simplify this as much as possible.

Alexander,  agree that I need to stick with a software setup once I get started.  That is why all your feedback is invaluable in helping me before I sink a lot of time into a possible solution that will not work.

Also agree with your POV re needing to think about this as workflow solution for writing.  Actually the more I think about it, this is a workflow solution for life, not just for writing a book.  Evernote tag/search capabilities bring potential to do away with much need for hierarchical structure, thinking, and workflow.

Until now, the world has necessarily been organized around hierarchies. This is no longer a limitation in a digital world. For further elaboration, read Everything is Miscellaneous by Dave Winer.

So far all your input reinforces my thinking that Evernote + Scrivener will be a great combo! Thanks all for very helpful feedback.

 


Posted by Vincek
Oct 15, 2011 at 06:33 PM

 

Hugh, based on your suggestion of outlining process recommended by Steven Berlin Johnson, I did a little digging. Is this what you were referring to:  http://www.stevenberlinjohnson.com/movabletype/archives/000230.html ?

This looks very promising.

 


Posted by Hugh
Oct 15, 2011 at 11:16 PM

 

Vincek wrote:
>Hugh, based on your suggestion of outlining process recommended by Steven Berlin
>Johnson, I did a little digging. Is this what you were referring to: 
>http://www.stevenberlinjohnson.com/movabletype/archives/000230.html
>?
> >This looks very promising. 


Vince,

No, I don’t think so.

I think it’s this article in the UK magazine Prospect:
http://www.prospectmagazine.co.uk/2009/03/cutandpastewriting/
which unfortunately requires subscribing.
The article you link to gives a flavour of some of the other useful features of DT, of which Steven Berlin Johnson is as you can see a fan (justifiably, in my opinion).

 

 


Posted by Alexander Deliyannis
Oct 16, 2011 at 01:35 PM

 

Vincek wrote:
>Until now, the world has necessarily been organized around hierarchies. This is no
>longer a limitation in a digital world. For further elaboration, read Everything is
>Miscellaneous by Dave Winer.

Yes, I’ve read it (it’s Weinberger by the way, Winer is the founder of the precedent to this here forum :-)

However, non-limitation is not always an advantage; a flat list of keywords is not necessarily a better descriptor of the world, which relies not only on objects’ properties, but also on relationships and structures. I’ve seen this in practice, supporting a portal where fixed categories have been found to be more useful for finding content than free keywords. I believe that much of Weinberger’s reasonable argumentation can be resolved by the use of ‘clones’ (identical synchronised copies of items placed in separate folders) which are supported by several outliners.

Within the context of writing a thesis, I expect that hierarchical structure and cross-referencing is unavoidable. By the way, I believe you’ll find Evernote’s recent support for links to its own notes very useful.

 


Posted by Vincek
Oct 17, 2011 at 05:32 AM

 

Hugh, thanks for correct pointer to Johnson article.

Alexander, thanks for pointing out author of Everything is Miscellaneous is Weinberger.

All, I also posted this same question on the Evernote forum and have received additional helpful feedback:

http://forum.evernote.com/phpbb/viewtopic.php?f=30&t=30838  Hugh… see espec comment by AndyDent.

 


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