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Curio 30% off till December 28th

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Posted by jamesofford
Dec 26, 2014 at 02:30 AM

 

Folks:

I have looked at Curio several times, but have always passed it by. It looks pretty interesting, but because of the wide range of things that it does, I have always felt overwhelmed at the prospect of trying it.
Are there any good sources that show how the software can be used?

 


Posted by Hugh
Dec 26, 2014 at 12:02 PM

 

jamesofford wrote:
Folks:
> >I have looked at Curio several times, but have always passed it by. It
>looks pretty interesting, but because of the wide range of things that
>it does, I have always felt overwhelmed at the prospect of trying it.
>Are there any good sources that show how the software can be used?

None that I know of James; Steve Z. or Paul Korm may know of something.

But… I don’t think that it’s particularly difficult to learn (nothing like as difficult as Tinderbox, for example). I find it useful to think of it as a whiteboard, and the various items that you can “pin” on that whiteboard. Then all you have to do is to learn the various methods of “pinning”, all of which follow a similar pattern.

 


Posted by Stephen Zeoli
Dec 26, 2014 at 12:09 PM

 

James,

I wrote a review of version 6.4 of Curio several years ago for the now defunct Mac AppStorm website. The page remains available (though I’m not sure for how long). You can find it here:

http://mac.appstorm.net/reviews/office-review/curio-a-workshop-for-your-creative-projects/

In that review I talk about what Curio is and who might benefit from using it.

A couple of years ago, I reviewed version 8 for AppStorm:

http://mac.appstorm.net/reviews/productivity-review/curio-8-the-ultimate-project-workshop-gets-better/

Some of what I wrote there is no outdated, of course, since Curio is in version 9.

Anyway, I hope these might be helpful.

Steve Z.

 


Posted by Paul Korm
Dec 26, 2014 at 03:26 PM

 

Stephen Z’s reviews are excellent—and influenced my own adoption of Curio.

As mentioned—the basics of Curio are straightforward.  The interface metaphor is similar to OneNote, so if you have experience there then Curio won’t seem difficult.  Also, there is a “Getting Started” document that can be opened any time from the Help menu which is a great way to explore features.  Finally, the Curio forum is very good, and George Browning the author and proprietor is a responsive and actively engaged.

 


Posted by MadaboutDana
Dec 28, 2014 at 12:45 PM

 

I entirely agree with Paul. Curio’s list of features is daunting. But the basic concept is extremely simple; much the same as OneNote.

The best thing to do is plunge in and start experimenting (there is a trial version, too).

Just add bits and pieces onto a couple of experimental workspaces, and you’ll soon be impressed at the sheer quality of the content. I actually use Curio to generate simple website graphics (charts etc.) because the quality is so good.

Once you’re ready to start investigating the app in more detail, read through the (very good) user manual, which is supplied as a Curio document.

 


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