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Stanford's Protege for OWL

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Posted by Amontillado
Jul 4, 2019 at 05:50 PM

 

I will need to present comparisons between some different software solutions. I’d like to produce something interactive, as in the way TheBrain exports to HTML.

TheBrain might be just what I need, but my long ago experiences with the old Java based Brain weren’t entirely positive. I’m sure it’s a far better product now.

In casting around, I found Standford’s Protégé OWL editor, and I’m intrigued. It’s probably too formal for my initial use, but I can see where it might make a nice planning tool for a complex project.

I have no experience with OWL, and my exposure to Protégé is no more than a quick glance.

It’s free, TheBrain isn’t, but that’s not the only factor in the equation.

Any thoughts about Protégé and OWL for writing and research?

Protégé can be found here - https://protege.stanford.edu

 


Posted by satis
Jul 4, 2019 at 06:45 PM

 

Biggest ding on this project is that it’s a Java Runtime app, meaning it’s going to be relatively slow, and has intrinsic security concerns (I removed Java from my Mac and only use it when occasionally necessary inside Chrome, which embeds the latest version and sandboxes it for web use).

What OS do you intend to use it with? It looks serviceable but somewhat clunky

https://protege.stanford.edu/assets/img/screenshots/desktopprotege-screenshot-4.jpg

 


Posted by Amontillado
Jul 5, 2019 at 03:34 AM

 

I do all my personal stuff on a Mac, with development mostly on Solaris and Linux. I keep my documentation on my Mac boxes at the moment, using Devonthink as an organizational and syncing tool.

Everybody in the department uses Onenote, so that may be my best way to produce an interactive, reader-driven report.

 


Posted by Alexander Deliyannis
Jul 5, 2019 at 03:48 AM

 

Quite a few of the information managers discussed here can export interactive HTML versions of their content, including expand/collapse, links, etc. From the cross-platform solutions I am aware of, Mindjet Mindmanager might be the most sophisticated, but it doesn’t come cheap.

Aside the price, an additional advantage of Onenote might be annotating by peers, assuming this is something useful.

Amontillado wrote:
>Everybody in the department uses Onenote, so that may be my best way to
>produce an interactive, reader-driven report.

 


Posted by Bernhard
Jul 5, 2019 at 05:48 AM

 

satis wrote:
Biggest ding on this project is that it’s a Java Runtime app, meaning
>it’s going to be relatively slow, and has intrinsic security concerns (I
>removed Java from my Mac and only use it when occasionally necessary
>inside Chrome, which embeds the latest version and sandboxes it for web
>use).
>

To mee, this sounds like story from the past. Modern JVM’s speed is often close enough to native code (
eg. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Criticism_of_Java#Performance).

The security concerns date back to the time when Java applets were used in web applications and one would (unintentionally) execute foreign insecure code. With desktop apps this is not the case.

They are as safe/unsafe as code from any source.

 


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