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Clibu, open beta

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Posted by Daly de Gagne
Nov 26, 2014 at 07:27 PM

 

Neville, even though I may not be able to use Clibu in a practical way initially, I am most interested in what you are doing. And though I remain to be convinced on a couple of things, you’ve made me doubt my assumptions, and I respect the high degree of thought and work you’ve put into Clibu.

I’ll be following Clibu’s course.

Given what we’re seeing from EN, and the number of similar start-ups, Clibu may be uniquely positioned and timed to do very well.

I wish you success!

Daly

 


Posted by Neville Franks
Nov 26, 2014 at 08:47 PM

 

Dr Andus wrote:

>>There will be full Export capabilities. The most widely used data
>>interchange format on the Web is JSON and this is what I plan to use.
> >Actually I meant something else: an export of the meta data of a given
>note or a selection of notes, only including title, original article
>URL, its own item URL, time and date created, tags, but not the full
>text and images. Let’s call them the properties of an item.
> >A bit like what the “Create Link” Chrome extension can do for a webpage
>or the CoLT Firefox add-on (and those are highly customisable regarding
>the output).

Ok, I understand. I assume you want to paste this into other documents, is that the use case?

 


Posted by Neville Franks
Nov 26, 2014 at 08:51 PM

 

kalkito wrote:
How much is it going to cost? I donĀ“t want to migrate my stuff to
>find later it’s too expensive.

I haven’t finalised pricing yet, however I’m thinking around $5 per month for a basic package, possibly less for a light package etc.

How does that sound?

 


Posted by Dr Andus
Nov 26, 2014 at 10:16 PM

 

>Dr Andus wrote:
>>Actually I meant something else: an export of the meta data of a given
>>note or a selection of notes, only including title, original article
>>URL, its own item URL, time and date created, tags, but not the full
>>text and images. Let’s call them the properties of an item.

Neville Franks wrote:
>Ok, I understand. I assume you want to paste this into other documents,
>is that the use case?

Yes, that’s right, e.g. to order a selection of notes into an outline in WorkFlowy or in a ConnectedText document, as part of a project dashboard. In both cases it would be useful not only to get the raw URL but a bit of description (note title at least).

The nice thing about the aforementioned Chrome/Firefox extensions is that they allow you to completely customise what you copy, so if you could make Clibu play nicely with them, that would be fine too.

 


Posted by Dr Andus
Nov 28, 2014 at 02:12 PM

 

Daly de Gagne wrote:
>Given what we’re seeing from EN, and the number of similar start-ups…

The big issue in this market seems to me how a developer balances the need to satisfy “power users” (who use the app constantly, need sophisticated features, deal with huge amount of data) and “light users” of the mass market who provide it with revenue.

The problem seems to be that the segment of “power users” is either too small for this kind of software to sustain the business or that there are marketing difficulties to reach them (marketing is too expensive or developer lacks marketing skills or is too busy developing).

I’m not convinced Evernote is a good model. I’ve stopped using it as soon as they started dumbing down, and I’ve seen lots of power users complaining about having been abandoned, and the ones that stayed seem to be complaining regularly (see the Evernote forum link in the other thread). It seems to me that Evernote has gone too far in chasing the “light user” dollar.

Maybe software developers could learn from gyms. A gym can have sophisticated equipment for power users, and it looks good for them when power users are around, showing off the use and benefits of the equipment. At the same time large enough amount of light users (and paying non-users) are constantly being recruited, who can use the sophisticated equipment in a “light user” way, and support the business with their membership. So there is a compromise that suits everyone.

Of course if light users overrun the gym to the extent that power users can’t use the equipment, then they go elsewhere, and the gym may suffer as a result, having lost its most loyal customers who draw in—and are role models for—new members.

Although software developers have the advantage that is fairly easy for them to create two (or more) different gyms, separated by a glass wall, for light, intermediate, pro, ultimate etc. users.

 


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