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best outliner you use? (2018)

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Posted by Listerene
May 7, 2018 at 04:37 AM

 

Inspiration is old and, somewhere along the line, repositioned itself for the education market BUT it’s still a very capable general outliner that was (perhaps) the first to combine an outliner with a mind map application.

Like TreePad, it was one of the first but still one of the best at what it does. If you haven’t tried it, you probably should.

For collecting notes and for extensive word processing which needs breaking into segments, I reach for TreePad before dumping the file into Word. For planning those extensive and segmented word processing projects and for organizing thoughts, I often first start with Inspiration before dumping it into TreePad and then Word.

Of course, it would be nice if Microsoft cared enough about its users to stop treating Office like a cash cow and put some R&D into adding these features seamlessly into Word BUT this process works very well for me.

 


Posted by MadaboutDana
May 7, 2018 at 06:59 AM

 

Those who are as fed up as I am about paying MS a regular subscription for Office365 might want to take a look at SoftMaker Office, a German software suite that’s now available for Windows, Linux and Mac and uses MS file formats as its own native file formats. I can thoroughly recommend the latest version.

I have grave doubts about the subscription model, I must say. The big companies in particular (Adobe, Microsoft) seem to feel that once you’re a subscriber, they can modify their software in any way they want to (usually with a strategic objective in mind, like getting you to store all your data in their respective Clouds), without consulting you or balancing these changes against user input (OneNote is a good example).

As for subscriptions to outliner software - well, colour me disillusioned, but I’m not convinced by that model, either. Let’s face it, it’s inherently anti-CRIMP; now you have to subscribe to apps if you want to continue playing with them, rather than having them tucked away on a hard drive for the occasional play, nostalgic revisit or blinding revelation (when you suddenly realise exactly how that strange little app you’ve always been drawn to can actually be put to constructive use).

Sorry, rambling this morning; this isn’t very relevant to the topic!

 


Posted by Paul J. Miller
May 7, 2018 at 08:07 AM

 

Unfortunately it looks like the next version of MyInfo will be going down the ‘Software as a Sentence’ route.

If more companies jump on this bandwagon it could become the norm !  :(

 


Posted by Dr Andus
May 7, 2018 at 10:19 AM

 

MadaboutDana wrote:
>I have grave doubts about the subscription model, I must say. The big
>companies in particular (Adobe, Microsoft) seem to feel that once you’re
>a subscriber, they can modify their software in any way they want to
>(usually with a strategic objective in mind, like getting you to store
>all your data in their respective Clouds), without consulting you or
>balancing these changes against user input (OneNote is a good example).

Not only that. They can raise the price whenever they feel like it, abusing the captive audience. Adobe hiked up the monthly subscription for the Creative Cloud from GBP15 to GBP 25 this year, which is a crazy increase.

>As for subscriptions to outliner software - well, colour me
>disillusioned, but I’m not convinced by that model, either. Let’s face
>it, it’s inherently anti-CRIMP

It will inevitably reduce competition because it limits consumers’ willingness to try out new things. Once you’ve reached the limit of subscriptions you can personally afford, it acts as a disincentive to looking at new stuff. I could see this leading to monopolies and killing of innovation.

Unfortunately subscriptions are attractive to providers because it is in human nature that people forget about their subscriptions or lose oversight about their real cost.

I have at least two subscriptions in the family that I need to cancel but I’ve been too busy to get around to it, as it involves some work, such as moving data off those services, finding alternatives, and keeping track of renewal dates to pick the best moment to cancel. In the meantime I keep paying, like a mug.

At the same time it’s preventing me from considering other purchases or subscriptions. So the industry is shooting itself in the foot to some extent. There will have to be a moment when the market reached saturation, when everyone has maxed out on the subscriptions they can afford. What then? Small providers, startups etc. will struggle to find customers, once Adobe, MS, Dropbox, Evernote etc. mopped up most of that disposable income.

 

 


Posted by Jon Polish
May 7, 2018 at 11:49 AM

 

No, there was no sarcasm intended.

My first post in this thread made it clear that I use Windows and was relating my experience with Windows based outliners. I had neglected to acknowledge AllMyNotes so I did. I also neglected to mention Info Select and some mind managers (Freeplane, XMind and TheBrain) which can be pressed into service as outliners (some have outliner-type trees).

I agree with your comments about AllMyNotes. It is hard on my eyes and the interface is more cartoon-like. There are some interesting features though, but it has been a long time since I looked at the program and I only vaguely remember what they are.

Donovan wrote:

>
>Jon Polish wrote:
>Although I would encourage learning IQ (it really is that good), have
>>you looked at AllMyNotes? It may satisfy your needs. And, it is a
>>Windows program with installed and portable versions.
>>
> >Hi Jon, I honestly am not sure if there’s a touch of sarcasm in your
>response to user cicerosc?
>AllMyNotes is about as far as you can get from IQ. From one extreme to
>another. AMN, in my opinion, has a user interface best suited for
>primary school children— with its cutesy icons and colors.
>I actually had a license for my 12 year-old and ran into problems with a
>licensing issue that was so petty on the part of the developer that it
>ruined it for me and my child. Again - IN MY OPINION - it’s very
>childish in presentation and developer communication.

 


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