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Dark themes

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Posted by Alexander Deliyannis
Feb 2, 2018 at 09:13 PM

 

Andy Brice wrote:
>I added a dark ‘skin’ for Hyper Plan on Windows a while back.

Thanks; admittedly I didn’t notice that, I’m still getting acquainted with this powerful programme of yours.

 


Posted by washere
Feb 2, 2018 at 09:49 PM

 

I used f.lux daily for a year on my daily goto smaller typewriter-ish laptop, still scheduled on my beasty huge one. Something about the color management they do, can’t put my finger on it. Most laptops have FN + Fxx key to dim lights, not color temp range though for sleep disorder.

Custom Dark themes on Windows might turn screen dead, can recover from safe mode if knowing what to do. Not for the faint hearted to mess about with. Some custom dark/black themes turned screen dead with total black with latest major win update, many still work though.

Hyper Plan dark mode is OK, good job, never used the regular theme anyway. Night Shift for mac will do. On Android for night color temp ranges, Twilight (Pro) is still best.

On Windows:

Press: Start Button
Type: Night Light

 


Posted by Christian Tietze
Feb 27, 2018 at 03:41 PM

 

Recently I stumbled upon a study that I found interesting, although you shouldn’t bet your livelihood on its validity: Dobres et al found recognition time of words typeset as black text on white background was 38% better (faster) than white text on black.

The reference data:
Dobres, J., Chahine, N., Reimer, B., Mehler, B. & Coughlin, J.F. (2014). Revealing Differences in Legibility Between Typefaces Using Psychophysical Techniques: Implications for Glance Time and Cognitive Processing. MIT AgeLab White Paper No. 2014-3. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

PDF link: http://agelab.mit.edu/files/Typeface/MT-MIT-Chinese-Word-Recognition-White-Paper_2014-06-24.pdf

 


Posted by Christian Tietze
Feb 27, 2018 at 03:42 PM

 

Recently I stumbled upon a study that I found interesting, although you shouldn’t bet your livelihood on its validity: Dobres et al found recognition time of words typeset as black text on white background was 38% better (faster) than white text on black.

The reference data:
Dobres, J., Chahine, N., Reimer, B., Mehler, B. & Coughlin, J.F. (2014). Revealing Differences in Legibility Between Typefaces Using Psychophysical Techniques: Implications for Glance Time and Cognitive Processing. MIT AgeLab White Paper No. 2014-3. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

PDF link: http://agelab.mit.edu/files/Typeface/MT-MIT-Chinese-Word-Recognition-White-Paper_2014-06-24.pdf

 


Posted by Alexander Deliyannis
Feb 28, 2018 at 07:21 PM

 

Christian Tietze wrote:
>Dobres et al found
>recognition time of words typeset as black text on white background was
>38% better (faster) than white text on black.

I’m sure this is valid. The famous marketing man David Ogilvy mentions the experience he had with a printed advertisement, which originally ran with white text on black background. Switching to black text on white background doubled the response rate.

If I could interact with my devices only with passive LCDs or e-ink displays (black on white), I would gladly choose them. My second choice would be amber monochrome which I found very easy on my eyes. But, alas, modern OSs and applications don’t take kindly to all of these.

By the way, I found this interesting reference:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monochrome_monitor
“Pixel for pixel, monochrome monitors produce sharper text and images than color CRT monitors. This is because a monochrome monitor is made up of a continuous coating of phosphor and the sharpness can be controlled by focusing the electron beam; whereas on a color monitor, each pixel is made up of three phosphor dots (one red, one blue, one green) separated by a mask. Monochrome monitors were used in almost all dumb terminals and are still widely used in text-based applications such as computerized cash registers and point of sale systems because of their superior sharpness and enhanced readability.”

 


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