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Posted by MadaboutDana
Oct 4, 2017 at 07:30 PM

 

Windows 10 is okay. Windows 8 was unacceptable, and was the single most significant reason for our decision to transition our entire business to Mac (apart from a couple of servers, that is). But Windows 10 isn’t too bad (although the remains of legacy Windows in there do drive me nuts!)

 


Posted by xtabber
Oct 5, 2017 at 12:26 PM

 

MadaboutDana wrote:
>Windows 10 isn’t too bad (although the remains of legacy Windows in there do drive me nuts!)

It’s the remains of legacy Windows in there that make Windows 10 a viable operating system for most Windows users.

 


Posted by Pierre Paul Landry
Oct 5, 2017 at 03:58 PM

 

xtabber wrote:
>It’s the remains of legacy Windows in there that make Windows 10 a viable operating system for most Windows users.

I’ll agree that the Windows Store doesn’t have a great selection of apps.
However, Windows 10 desktop is not a “legacy” OS but is a great environment, with great apps, and innovative hardware (Surface et al, tablets, 2 in 1, etc.)
And of course, there is Touch and Ink, both of which I would not live without.

Pierre

 


Posted by bobmclain
Oct 5, 2017 at 06:02 PM

 

MadaboutDana wrote:
Windows 10 is okay. Windows 8 was unacceptable, and was the single most
>significant reason for our decision to transition our entire business to
>Mac (apart from a couple of servers, that is). But Windows 10 isn’t too
>bad (although the remains of legacy Windows in there do drive me nuts!)

Seems abrupt. Why not just stick with Windows 7, as many businesses did? I imagine there’s “legacy” in every operating system.

 


Posted by MadaboutDana
Oct 6, 2017 at 07:06 AM

 

@bob

It’s a good question. The answer is that with Windows 8, Microsoft really did seem to have lost the plot. They appeared to me, an inveterate ICT industry watcher, to have panicked and put all their money on an operating system for all platforms, which was consequently an outrageous kludge. Unlike most businesses, we’ve never hung on to an earlier version of an operating system because it “just worked”, not least due to the inevitable security considerations - we didn’t want to find ourselves in a Windows XP situation further down the road. So my primary concern (apart from training) was strategic: just where was Microsoft going, did their vision convince me, and did I regard their strategy as sustainable? And the answers to these questions (3.5 years ago) were: dunno, no, and no.

Furthermore, I’d been watching macOS very carefully, and had been impressed by the very careful, incremental approach taken to that operating system. I’ve experimented with Linux, but as a mainstream business OS for a company like ours, which needs to use tools/accept files that are generally optimised for/exclusive to Windows, Linux simply doesn’t hack it, especially when you’ve got staff training to consider. On the other hand, our staff all took to Mac like ducks to water, despite the obvious differences with Windows - I was actually very surprised by how little training we had to do.

And my anxiety was, to an extent, born out. It’s taken Microsoft about 2.5 years to remedy the Windows 8 ghastliness, resulting in…

@pierre

I agree, on the whole, Pierre - I like Windows 10. It’s lighter, faster and much better designed than Windows 8, and the Microsoft vision does appear, on the whole, to have worked reasonably well (although I’d still argue it’s a peculiar compromise between the touchscreen- and mouse-driven user experience). And the legacy aspects are very much in the background, where only sysadmins are likely to find them (or want to find them!).

But Microsoft still makes me nervous, because they bob about so much (pace @bob). There are rumours that the Surface line is about to be scrapped (making too much of a loss), and you of all people will be aware of the way Microsoft’s programming approach has veered wildly around over the last few years, causing many people who’d invested heavily in one or the other of their purportedly favoured programming languages to give up in disgust. Indeed, I’d argue that Microsoft’s indecisiveness helped Apple at various crucial junctures, but IANAP, so I can’t be sure of that.

 


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